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We are proud to be supporting Yorkshire and Humber’s successful bid to become a Local Health and Care Record Exemplar with our technical solution for a Person Held Record called Helm. This is a credit to their national and international leadership in this field and a sign of a change in the health IT marketplace.  

The delivery of an open standards and open platform based person held record was originally supported by the city of Leeds thanks to the leadership of Dylan Roberts, Chief Digital and Information Officer at Leeds City Council, but will now be made available to the geographical footprint that makes up Yorkshire and Humber, involving over 70 organisations.  It is also being discussed in other Local Integrated Care Record Exemplar areas including Greater Manchester with Salford Royal GDE moving to explore the technology.

The benefits of supporting an open platform approach allows Helm to be built in such a way so that it will becomes accessible across geographies and care providers regardless of the clinical system in use.

Helm puts users in control of their own health and care data by allowing them to view and add to key information, starting with medical data and growing to include wider public services. For the first time, the public will be able to see and interact with their own records and data on an easy to use, secure, online platform that encourages them to take control of their own health and wellbeing.  Helm reflects this new position with a “Take Control, Take the Helm” strapline and call to action.

Dr Tony Shannon, Director at Ripple Foundation added, “Over the past few months we’ve noticed a real shift in emphasis within the Health IT sector towards adopting an open platform with open standards.  At Ripple Foundation we truly believe this is the only way to stop the mediocrity of an underperforming health IT sector. By building Helm on an open platform, in line with the international openEHR standard, we are working to support a transformative move to future proof healthcare IT systems.

Tony continued, “Ripple Foundation’s mission is to improve the care of patients and citizens alike by providing technology that supports their needs and delivers easy to use systems that are scalable and cost effective.”

Helm will adopt the Ripple Foundation’s showcase stack which can be broken into three levels:

PulseTile – leading edge UX/UI framework developed by Ripple Foundation

QewdJS  – versatile middleware led by Rob Tweed of MGateway Ltd

EtherCIS – powerful openEHR compliant backend/data repository led by Christian Chevalley of ADOC Software Development.   

Each component harnesses the power of open source and aims to demonstrate open standards in action to show that there is a different way to provide technology into the health and care systems and ultimately to the users of Helm.

For further information about the Helm and open platform technology please contact info@ripple.foundation.

 

ENDS

  1. Ripple Foundation is a community interest company that is supporting the adoption of an open health and care platform.  It is a clinically led team that working with communities to support using an integrated digital care platform for today and the future. Open source, open standards and underpinned by an open architecture that can be used worldwide.
  2. For media enquiries about Ripple Foundation, please contact info@ripple.foundation or visit the website for more information www.ripple.foundation

EtherCIS Clinical Data Repository is developing at pace with radical new improvements in its latest V1.2 release including enhanced security, more complex querying, federation,  improved configuration capabilities and much more. EtherCIS is the leading open source implementation of the openEHR standard in action (including AQL support) and these new developments make the use of EtherCIS even more compelling in the marketplace.  

EtherCIS development is supported by the non profit Ripple Foundation and is a key component of their “showcase stack” and work towards an open platform in healthcare.  It is led by Christian Chevalley of ADOC Software Development who said, “We’re thrilled with the latest release of EtherCIS and proud that our work combines contributions by the community across the globe.  It is helping Health IT to become sustainable, open, vendor neutral and delivers patient centered clinical data handling with knowledge engineering.  Helping to deliver this message to key decision makers and leaders has been part of Ripple Foundation’s mission and we are excited to be part of the action.”

Dr Tony Shannon, Director of Ripple Foundation said, “We welcome the work that Christian and his company is continuing to deliver for EtherCIS, it’s a great achievement and really helps to ensure that open platforms are the future of Health IT.   We are also thankfully that cities like Leeds in Britain are implementing EtherCIS in their area for Helm, the adoption of an open platform Person Held Record.  EtherCIS is helping to contribute to the global endeavour of improving data quality, access, storage and research which is fit for 21st Century care.”

Below is some further information on the enhancements made or if you require an indepth understanding please visit Github at https://github.com/ethercis/ethercis .  

Enhanced Security

EtherCIS upgrade ensures sensitive data is further protected against eavesdropping and it controls access to the database, so users can only access the data they have been authorised to see.  

Enhanced openEHR querying (AQL)

Users can now perform more complex querying due to new enhancements using openEHR templates for meta data. The openEHR standard has been adopted and implemented across healthcare systems throughout the world, representing the future of health IT.

Federation

Improved federation which allows information retrieval technology to simultaneously search in multiple resources. This means that a user can make a single query request which is then distributed to the search engines, databases or other query engines participating in the federation.

More configuration capabilities

EtherCIS REST server now supports a full set of parameters for basic HTTP, SSL, low resource monitoring and request logging.

Under the hood improvements

There has been an upgrade to a number of critical components including REST server, DB programmatic interface and XML handling. EtherCIS libraries have been cleaned up and simplified to reduce dependency conflicts and many unit tests have been finalised

To find out more about Ripple Foundation please visit www.ripple.foundation

 

ENDS

  1. Ripple Foundation is a community interest company that is supporting the adoption of an open health and care platform.  It is a clinically led team that working with communities to support using an integrated digital care platform for today and the future. Open source, open standards and underpinned by an open architecture that can be used worldwide.
  2. EtherCIS Clinical Data Repository. More info available at  http://ripple.foundation/ethercis/
  3. openEHR: openEHR Foundation. More info available at http://www.openehr.org/
  4. AQL: Archetype Query Language. More info available at
    http://www.openehr.org/releases/QUERY/latest/docs/AQL/AQL.html
  5. For media enquiries about Ripple, please contact info@ripple.foundation or visit the website for more information www.ripple.foundation
  6. For technical enquiries about EtherCIS, please contact ethercis@ripple.foundation.

 

Developments in recent months have brought the leading work of QEWD.js to even greater heights. Three key areas bring the technology led by Rob Tweed of M/Gateway Ltd bang up to date in the refactoring of the Ripple-QEWD solution:

  • Shift towards a microservices based architecture
  • Leveraging the power of JSON Web Tokens (JWT) to secure the technology
  • The Dockerisation of the solution to enable ease of install for this powerful technology

QEWD.js is a lightweight yet very powerful open source technology. The recent improvements make it even more appealing and central to Ripple Foundation’s open platform adoption mission.

For more information about QEWD.js and the QEWD-Ripple microservices infrastructure please check out these links:

http://qewdjs.com/

https://github.com/RippleOSI/Ripple-QEWD-Microservices

Apperta_Defining_an_Open_Platform_SP

Defining an Open Platform – Thought-provoking collaborative document from the Apperta Foundation that we highly recommend reading.  

The paper has pulled together with the experience and knowledge from a wide range of clinical, health informatics and health system economics including our very own Dr Tony Shannon but also….   

  • Ewan Davis – Woodcote Consulting
  • Dr Ian McNicoll – openEHR Foundation
  • Dr Roland Appel – Maycroft Consulting
  • Silas Davis – Monax
  • Dr Rebecca Wassall – Apperta Foundation
  • Peter Coates – NHS Digital Code4Health

We believe that the thinking within the report is relevant not just to the UK and Ireland but across the globe so please share this document with colleagues.

 

Leeds is leading the way in developing and piloting an open platform based Person Held Record (PHR) for local people.  It follows extensive engagement with individuals, care professionals and stakeholders across the city to understand their needs and aspirations. It is believed a PHR will help people to better manage and control their own care and wellbeing and help prevent further health issues.

The PHR programme will be led by Leeds City Council in partnership with NHS organisations across the city.  The technology will be built on an internationally leading open source platform for the health and care sector, developed in Leeds by the Ripple Foundation.  Leeds’ philosophy around digital technology of simplify, standardise and share allows flexibility and scalability with the intention to share easily with others across the nation.

Phase one will enable people to register, verify their identity and log into their PHR. It will let people contribute and update information about themselves, for example, a top three things to know about me.  It will also integrate with the Leeds Care Record that is widely used by care professionals across the city.

Councillor Rebecca Charlwood, Chair of the Leeds Health and Wellbeing Board said, “Leeds is the second largest city in the UK outside London, with a diverse population of over 770,000 people. We need to nurture a health and care system where people have more conversations and opportunities to help unlock the best solutions for them. The Person Held Record programme is a key enabler of this work.”

 

“The city of Leeds has the skills and ability to create cutting edge technology for its citizens. The decision to develop a Person Held Record is another clear example”, said Dylan Roberts, chief digital and information officer for Leeds City Council.  “We will work closely with the people of Leeds, care professionals and national organisations to ensure any technology we build and implement can be reused across the nation.”

 

Dr Jason Broch, GP partner at Oakwood Lane Medical Practice and Chair of the Leeds Informatics Board said, “Patients need to access their record to allow them to understand their health and wellbeing better and input their own information to take a more active role. It is the missing piece of the jigsaw towards truly integrated care.  In Leeds we believe a Person Held Record will be central to this change.”

 

Leeds is also hoping the market will help create apps and functionality that will work with the open platform because they conform to the standards set. For example, if you have a chronic long term condition, you will be able to personalise your PHR with this information, allowing for a more joined up view.

Dr Tony Shannon, Director at Ripple Foundation added, “Healthcare is suffering from an underperforming health IT sector which makes it harder for care professionals to work with their patients efficiently and effectively.  By building their Person Held Record on an open platform, in line with the international open EHR standard, Leeds has started a transformational move to future proof its healthcare IT systems.

Tony continued, “Ripple Foundation’s mission is to improve the care of patients and citizens alike by providing technology that supports their needs and delivers easy to use systems that are scalable and cost effective.”

 

For further information about the Person Held Record in Leeds please contact dylan.roberts@leeds.gov.uk If you are interested in the technology of an open platform please contact info@ripple.foundation

Ripple Foundation is proud to be leveraging the multi-purpose QEWD.js as a world leading integration framework to meet the increasing demands of Healthcare IT.  

QEWD.js is an incredible versatile middleware that Ripple Foundation, a not for profit organisation, is endorsing as part of its showcase stack in the pursuit an open health and care platform to improve clinical systems.  It offers an integration framework that can link the UI components you need with the APIs you want and the database you use.  QEWD.js is a framework that is perfect for web integration challenge because it is fast, capable, flexible and scalable.

Ripple Foundation have five reasons why they believe that QEWD.js is a great choice for the 21st Century demands that clinicians and technicians face:

  • Web Integration Framework – ready, willing and able
  • Quick and Easy Development –  gets you up and running quickly
  • Quality for Enterprise – built to be superfast, solid, secure and scalable
  • Javascript and JSON Based – QEWD.js leverages NodeJS and JSON
  • Open Source – openly shared to be publicly and freely accessible

Rob Tweed, the technical leader behind QEWD.js and co-owner of M/Gateway Developments Ltd said, “I’m acutely aware of the issues that health and care is facing not only in Britain but also around the world.  I am encouraged that Ripple Foundation see the value of our quality web enterprise development platform – QEWD.js – to help tackle some of the issues facing HealthIT.  It’s open source, super-fast, scalable and adaptable – what’s not to like?”

Dr Tony Shannon, Director of Ripple Foundation said, “QEWD.js is a key component of the Ripple Foundation’s showcase stack and should be taken very seriously.  It’s been cleverly crafted by Rob Tweed and it’s an incredibly versatile integration framework that is swift, agile and flexible.  If you combine QEWD.js with the rest of Ripple Foundation’s showcase stack – PulseTile and EtherCIS – they offer the basis of an open platform that can be used across the world – large or small scale.  Being modular, the flexibility is yours – please use it, get involved, build upon it and share the learning”.

To learn more about QEWD.js please visit the newly launched website – http://qewdjs.com/.  To find out more about Ripple Foundation’s work please look around this website www.ripple.foundation

 

 

The world of healthcare can now begin to leverage the power and potential of the EtherCIS Clinical Data Repository. EtherCIS development has been supported by the non profit Ripple Foundation and this leading technology now provides the key foundation of its “showcase stack” and work towards an open platform in healthcare.  EtherCIS development is led by Christian Chevalley of ADOC Software Development and the EtherCIS technology is now the leading open source implementation of the openEHR standard in action (including AQL support). The openEHR standard has been adopted and implemented across healthcare systems throughout the world, representing the future of health IT.

Christian Chevalley of ADOC Software Development said, “EtherCIS being open sourced is not accidental, it is organically inherited from its fundamental components and philosophy. It is based on the open standard openEHR that specifies an open, vendor neutral, patient centred clinical data handling and knowledge engineering. Its implementation has been feasible due to the remarkable progress of the open source database PostgreSQL supporting the combination of relational and document typed data efficiently. Most of EtherCIS components have been derived from open source building bricks: service architecture, object oriented database querying, data serialisation, Web communication etc. As such, it is the result of the contributions of hundreds of analysts and developers.

Christian continued to say, “Open Source entitles anybody to have access to the source code, uses and copies the software and contributes to it; it is technically extremely convenient, however to promote successfully EtherCIS into the highly competitive Healthcare IT arena, it had to be free as in Libre. As a free and open software platform, it gives the freedom to anyone to create copy and run a clinical applications that is respectful of the fundamental right to store, query and interchange medical information without being tied to a specific vendor, proprietary encoding or physical location.

“Ripple Foundation has been instrumental to make this achievable; it has not only provided the necessary means to achieve EtherCIS development, but has also stimulated the collaboration, contributions and reviews by clinicians and IT peers, internationally. The result is a solid and relevant IT platform that is now naturally and logically fully integrated into the Ripple Foundation, supporting the adoption of an open health and care platform. The mission and values that Ripple Foundation is abiding by firmly sits with my own views, so I’m thrilled that EtherCIS is now officially part of the Ripple Foundation family.”

Dr Tony Shannon, Director of Ripple Foundation said, “We are honoured to be supporting EtherCIS as a key element of the Ripple Foundation’s open platform showcase stack.  We know to improve health IT we need data, information and knowledge to support the complex and highly pressurised health and care system.  EtherCIS ensures that information and data can be accessed, stored and exchanged securely because it a world leading open source example of the vendor-neutral & technology-neutral openEHR standard in action, developed and tested in the context of a highly usable clinical application. EtherCIS is a Clinical Data Repository fit for 21st Century Health and Care.”  

 

ENDS

  1. Ripple Foundation is a community interest company that is supporting the adoption of an open health and care platform.  It is a clinically led team that working with communities to support using an integrated digital care platform for today and the future. Open source, open standards and underpinned by an open architecture that can be used worldwide.
  2. Ripple Foundation is supporting and promoting the #1percent open digital platform challenge fund that is hoped will stimulate and support both the creation and adoption of an open digital ecosystem for the nation.
  3. EtherCIS Clinical Data Respository. More info available at  http://ripple.foundation/ethercis/
  4. openEHR: openEHR Foundation. More info available at http://www.openehr.org/
  5. AQL: Archetype Query Language. More info available at
    http://www.openehr.org/releases/QUERY/latest/docs/AQL/AQL.html
  6. For media enquiries about Ripple, please contact info@ripple.foundation or visit the website for more information www.ripple.foundation
  7. For technical enquiries about EtherCIS, please contact ethercis@ripple.foundation.

 

Ripple Foundation is launching a series of three videos that introduces viewers to openEHR. openEHR is an open, clinically lead approach to creating a standards based healthcare platform for the 21st Century. This includes standardised clinical content and information models for the health and care market.  Allowing vendors and developers of front-end and back-end solutions to leverage a common set of standards to help design, store and querying rich clinical information sources.  openEHR is leading the international field in this effort, with benefits for stakeholders and key decision makers which allows them to :

  •   let their clinical experts be directly involved in solution development, via archetype authoring
  •   built a patient centred record while avoiding technology and/or vendor lock-in
  •   retain ownership of the data for primary and secondary use

Put another way… it is an open data standard, both vendor and technology neutral, that’s been designed to support the needs of 21st Century Healthcare. 

Each video is approximately two minutes long and can be shared with anyone who wishes to understand more about openEHR.

Watch. Learn. Share. #openEHR

 

This short video is part 2 of a 3 part series to help explain openEHR, the future of healthcare IT.

Watch. Learn. Share. #openEHR

 

This short video is the last of a 3 part series to help explain openEHR, the future of healthcare IT.

Watch. Learn. Share. #openEHR